KEYC - Mankato Zero Waste Raises Composting Efforts

Mankato Zero Waste Raises Composting Efforts

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MANKATO , MINN. -

The Mankato Zero Waste program is ramping up efforts to try and educate people about the benefits of recycling household organics into useable compost.

Mankato Zero Waste is a grass roots organization focused on reducing waste in all forms.

Their biggest effort currently is to provide drop–off sites at no extra charge for recycling household organics into useable compost.

"You can take your compostable or your organic compostables, drop them off at our two drop off sites one is here at the public works center on Victory Avenue and the other is at Sibley Park."

Compostable items consist of food scraps, food–soiled and non–recyclable paper, and other compostable items such as coffee grounds or hair and nail clippings.

Benefits from composting include enriching soil for gardens and fields, reduce the need for chemical fertilizers, reduce methane emissions from landfills and help with soil being able to cope with the effects of climate change.

Everyone can agree composting is beneficial for the environment, but educating people on how to get involved is the toughest task.

"But it's a constant job of promotion and education you know a lot of people really want to do this but we have to keep it simple enough so that people can feel comfortable if they do nothing else than collect their food scraps each day from their meals and from their prep for a meal and give those to a dumpster we will accomplish a great deal.  But there is a lot more they can recycle with the organics system, the commercial system takes a lot more than you can do in your backyard composting bin."

As for curbside compost pickup in Mankato?  This is not yet an option.  The organization is trying to figure out what would work best for the communities of Mankato, North Mankato and Lake Crystal at this time.

Zero Waste Mankato and City of Mankato officials have until June of 2018 to analyze data and surveys from the people to figure out what would work best for the communities composting future.

--KEYC News 12.