Governor Tim Walz signs bill into law allocating $300 million for opioid epidemic

The funds will be allocated at a county level toward public health, human services and public safety initiatives aimed at addressing the opioid epidemic.
Published: May. 11, 2022 at 11:12 PM CDT
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ST. PAUL, Minn. (KEYC) - $300 million headed to address Minnesota’s opioid crisis. Governor Tim Walz signed the bill into law today. In February Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison announced the $26 billion multi-state agreement with opioid manufacturer Johnson and Johnson and major pharmaceutical distributors.

“We knew that this would be coming, there has been a lot of work that has been done over the last several weeks. months, and years to prepare for this point and for it to be signed into law,” deputy director for Mankato Public Safety Matt DuRose said.

Minnesota’s share of $300 million is going to be distributed over the next 18 years. The amount was determined based on the number of overdose deaths, number of residents with substance abuse disorder, the number of opioids prescribed and the population of the state.

“Money certainly helps but there is a lot of work that needs to be done within the community and this funding will help with a lot of that work but there is work that needs to be done outside of these funds as well,” DuRose said.

The Mankato area has resources for those struggling with addiction including Beyond Brink which aims to assist people on their road to recovery by empowering those who are aiming to maintain long-term recovery by providing tools to promote wellness.

“It is breaking down the stigma that surrounds substance use, it’s showing people that the people that are struggling with substance use are people too,” certified peer recovery specialist for Beyond Brink Ricky Sullivan said.

Places like Beyond Brink are part of the outreach and education about substance use and abuse.

“It is nice to know that there are resources and support out there and that there are people that will work with you with empathy and compassion,” Sullivan said.

The funds will be allocated at a county level toward public health, human services and public safety initiatives aimed at addressing the opioid epidemic.

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