Construction underway at Mayo Clinic Health System Event Center

The Mayo Clinic Health System Event Center has been bringing people together in the heart of Mankato for 25 years, and now, it’s getting some major upgrades.
Published: Sep. 15, 2022 at 7:08 PM CDT|Updated: Sep. 15, 2022 at 7:11 PM CDT
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MANKATO, Minn. (KEYC) - The Mayo Clinic Health System Event Center has been bringing people together in the heart of Mankato for 25 years, and now, it’s getting some major upgrades to keep up with the town’s growing entertainment and sports scenes.

“We have about $11 million in improvements that need to be addressed, we know. What we’ve issued out this year is a financial plan that’s going to address essentially $8.5 million worth of improvements over there,” said Parker Skophammer, director of administrative services at the City of Mankato.

Several projects are in the works, including a new roof, exterior wall panels that will change the green siding to gray, chiller system and an ice plant.

“It’s great to see some investment into the Civic Center to continue to make it that focal point of our community that drives traffic, that drives tourism to our community,” stated Andy Wilke, director of business development and public affairs at Greater Mankato Growth.

Over the years, the event center has become a driving force behind Mankato’s economic success.

“The Civic Center has a substantial financial impact which helps our businesses, helps our residents as well and helps make sure that we can have a local economy that’s thriving and has a lot of economic vitality throughout our region,” Wilke mentioned.

Construction is already underway on the roof, siding and ice plant.

It should be done by November when the chiller replacement begins.

“Some testing will take place over the course of October, and then right now the intention is to go live on that new ice plant in November,” Skophammer explained.

All upgrades are expected to be completed by March.

“It ensures that we have a quality of life asset that’s going to be relevant, both from an aesthetic, system, structural [standpoint] for years to come,” Skophammer added.

In the meantime, the City says the building’s construction shouldn’t interfere with its events.