MCHS: Daylight Savings can cause health risks

While the extra hour of sleep could come in handy, there are some impacts on health that come with changing the clocks twice a year.
Published: Nov. 4, 2022 at 12:07 PM CDT
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MANKATO, Minn. (KEYC) - This weekend, we turn our clocks back one hour, marking the end of daylight saving time.

Early sunday morning, at 2 a.m., Clock go back an hour.

While the extra hour of sleep could come in handy... There are some impacts that come with changing the clocks twice a year.

Doctor Timothy Young with Mayo Clinic Health System says the hour lost in the spring can lead to more than just mood changes.

”Most of the studies have been done in the Spring when we lose an hour of sleep,” said Dr. Young. “And there has been some associated risk with increased heart attacks, increased traffic accidents. It’s not exactly clear why that is, and you’d think that would all reverse in the Fall when we get that extra hour.”

Dr. Young says there is some evidence the body takes 24 to 48 hours to recover and that there is still time to plan ahead.