Minnesota DFL party recognizes full trifecta of state government control

This is the first time the party has taken full power of the state government since 2013.
This is the first time the party has taken full power of the state government since 2013.
Updated: Nov. 9, 2022 at 6:00 PM CST
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MANKATO, Minn. (KEYC) - Election results have been called: the Minnesota DFL now has control in the Governor’s office, as well as the state House and Senate.

“It was unexpected,” said Minnesota state senator Nick Frentz. “I think the prevailing wisdom was that the needle would move a couple percentage points in favor of the Republicans in Minnesota. And so, this was a pleasant surprise for Democrats.”

After a long night of watching projected results for close races across the state, election results swayed in full favor of the Minnesota DFL party.

Once Republican Senate majority leader Jeremy Miller conceded to Senate Democrats on Wednesday morning, the Minnesota DFL announced its full trifecta: the Governor’s office, the state House, and the state Senate.

“And I also know last night’s vote was not just a pat on the back. It was a mission order going forward,” Governor Tim Walz said. “It was about a vision, about what we can do.”

This is the first time the party has taken full power of the state government since 2013.

Now, the state DFL members expect less resistance in passing legislation.

“The first thing is the budget surplus,” said Frentz. “So, we have a budget surplus that we should go to work getting figured out and get that money back to Minnesota taxpayers and get the money invested in the places Minnesota want us to invest in.”

“Now is the time for us to get back to work,” proclaimed Walz. “And I’ll say it again today: I will work with anyone who is willing to help make things better for Minnesota.”

Despite the Democratic control of state government, they say there’s still a desire to work toward compromise and bipartisanship with Republican lawmakers.

“I think the public appreciates it when it can be bipartisan,” said Frentz. “We can’t agree on every issue- but where you can find compromise and agreement, I think it’s a better result and you have more buy-in, not just at the capital, but from the people you’re trying to serve you.”