Minnesota’s voter turnout stays high and LGBTQ+ community makes history

FILE - This year, a record number of 340 out LGBTQ candidates won their elections across the...
FILE - This year, a record number of 340 out LGBTQ candidates won their elections across the U.S., beating the record of 336 set in 2020, according to the LGBTQ Victory Institute. South Central MN Pride says this is a step in the right direction.(KEYC News Now)
Published: Nov. 11, 2022 at 1:59 PM CST
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MANKATO, Minn. (KEYC) - Minnesota’s Voter turnout has always been one of the highest in the nation, and Tuesday’s election was no exception.

The Minnesota Secretary of State said that about 60% of eligible Minnesotans voted in the 2022 general election. The only other states posting rates above 60% are Maine and Wisconsin.

Blue Earth County had a turnout of 50% with 26,500 voters.

“It seems like we’re a little bit below the average for this stage, but still like I mentioned, pretty good,” Blue Earth County election director, Michael Stalberger said. “We had higher turnout among some of our younger voters which is good. And then we also had some really busy times in our office here with our male ballot voters who wanted to vote on Election Day that had received a ballot in the mail.”

This year, a record number of 340 out LGBTQ candidates won their elections across the U.S. Beating the record of 336 set in 2020, according to the LGBTQ Victory Institute. South Central Minnesota Pride says this is a step in the right direction.

“Young people and you know potential political candidates in the future and you know, it lets them know that somebody has paved that way for them and that we’re going to continue to make progress,” said Charlie Johnston, board chair of South Central Minnesota Pride.

In Minnesota, Leigh Finke became the first Transgender State lawmaker to be elected. As well as, Alicia Kozlowski being elected to the state House as the legislature’s first nonbinary member.

“By seeing these people get elected across the country lets them know [young people] that the world is changing, right? added Johnston. “There’s still a lot of work to do but we’re seeing people get voted in who are hopefully going to help us continue that work in moving in the right direction.”